Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Networking Scams

Watch out for networking scams! As an author you want to promote your book through a variety of venues, including book signings, personal sales, an online presence or through networking.

These are good pursuits. The more you get yourself out there the better your chances of broadening your exposure. However, you also are subject to scams.

Recently, I received a letter saying, someone nominated me to become a member of a women’s professional networking organization. On the postcard, they listed their Web site for me to visit. I did that. It looked legit.

Since I am a member of the local chamber of commerce and they referred me to a reporter for an interview a month ago, I believed they could have passed on my name on this. I filled out the card, omitting my e-mail address. The card required my address, telephone number and perhaps my Web site but no other personal information. Thus I sent it in without worrying about relaying private information. If it did, I would not have completed it.

A couple of weeks rolled by and I never thought more about it until last week when I received a call from them. They asked me about the other professional organizations I belonged to and more about my business. I gave them the information and my e-mail address since they said the membership was selective on whom they would grant membership. I promoted myself, saying I was a member of such and such and my book, Seasons of the Soul, received Best of Year from www.Christianstoryteller.com and my short story, “The Silver Lining” (which is free to read on Smashwords) came in 10th on the 79th Writer’s Digest Writing Competition in the mainstream/literary short story category.

The caller stated they would love to focus me in their newsletter. I was thrilled at the extra exposure but then the woman hit with their membership dues - a stunning more than $600 for one type or $400 and something for their networking membership. “We need to place this on your credit card,” knowing earlier I selected the networking one.

Stunned, I composed myself. “That’s too much.”

“Well,” she continued, We have a $289 membership which would allow you such and such.

I replied, “I would have to ask my husband and would rather send a check. Could you send me the information?” I knew I would never submit the check.

“No, we need to confirm this through credit card. We have another membership for $189 which ...”

“Again,” I reiterated, “I would have to ask my husband.”

Exasperated, she offered me their free newsletter. “Let me connect you with processing.”

I heard the click and stayed on the line. When after several seconds no one connected with me, I hung up the phone.

What a scam. Thank God I had the good sense to not give them my credit card number but how many others were vulnerable to this technique? I do not want to give the women’s organization’s name but it is located in Garden City, New York. Watch for them or other groups portraying themselves as one thing but really a front to reach into your pocket.

3 comments:

  1. I'm glad you came though it without getting taken. I think a lot of them have caught to the fact we are all getting suspicious of their old approaches and are changing tactics. You were very smart. Thanks for the heads up.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes, I agree because this scam was professionally done. It really took you in and their Web site address looked so legit.

    ReplyDelete
  3. You have a fabulous blog! I’m an author and illustrator and I made some awards to give to fellow bloggers whose sites I enjoy. I want to award you with the Creative Blog Award for all the hard work you do!

    Go to http://astorybookworld.blogspot.com/p/awards.html and pick up your award.
    ~Deirdra

    ReplyDelete